Greeting Cards

SKU:
6513
$2.50

The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) undergoes the most spectacular insect migration on earth. Monarchs lay their eggs only on milkweed, a plant that is both poisonous and very sensitive to chemical herbicides. Promoting pesticide-free farming, and protecting and planting milkweed will help preserve the monarch.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6514
$2.50

The pine grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator) is a favourite of bird watchers with its bright red plumage and tame behaviour. This bird is a year round resident of Canada's boreal forest. The Wilderness Committee advocates the protection of 50% of Canada's boreal forest for wildlife like the pine grosbeak to survive.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6515
$2.50

Mountain caribou is a subspecies of the woodland caribou, one of the three types of caribou in Canada. Historically, about 10,000 mountain caribou existed in BC, however industrial logging of their habitat has reduced their number to only 1,900. Mountain caribou need old-growth rainforest valleys for their survival.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6516
$2.50

(Bubo scandiacus) are powerful birds that primarily rely on lemmings for food. One of the largest owls in North America, the snowy owl has a wingspan of 1.5 metres. Its fluffy plumage helps maintain a body temperature of 38°C even when the air temperature is -50°C. Snowy owls are Arctic specialists, who only venture to southern Canada during times of food shortage. They are the official bird of Quebec.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6517
$2.50

Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea) are a small finch that breeds in open subarctic coniferous forests. These birds travel in huge flocks, flitting from tree to tree, and are often seen hanging upside down on branch tips feeding on small seeds. They venture to Southern Canada in the winter in search of food.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6518
$2.50

Bohemian Waxwings (Bombycilla garrulus) are nomadic, boreal forest birds that nest in northern bogs and muskegs. In winter, they travel in large flocks of up to 10,000 individuals searching for leftover tree fruit throughout much of southern Canada. Known as 'party' birds, bohemian waxwings often gorge themselves on berries causing a type of drunkenness and much revelry.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6519
$2.50

Polar Bears (Ursus maritimus) are extremely well adapted to the cold with 60% of their plummeting global population living in Canada's arctic. These immense carnivores can consume up to 20% of their body weight in food. However, fast melting sea ice is making it harder for polar bears to hunt for their principal food: ringed seals. Immediate international and Canadian action on climate change is needed for the ongoing survival of this iconic animal.

SKU:
6520
$2.50

Red-headed Woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) are one of only four woodpeckers that cache their food, including nuts, seeds, fruit and insects, in trees for later use. With distinctive bright red heads and big personalities, this woodpecker's antics and aerodynamic fly-catching provide great entertainment. Their habitat in central and eastern Canadian provinces is threatened when the old trees in which they nest are cleared for development.

SKU:
6521
$2.50

Tiger or Columbia lilies (Lilium columbianum) are native to the southern mountains of British Columbia and Alberta. The bulb of this flower is traditionally used by First Nations as a raw spicy snack or cooked as sweet starch, often mixed with salmon roe. Cutting the flowers or digging up their bulbs other than for traditional aboriginal uses is discouraged as this can hinder natural propagation.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6522
$2.50

The black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is one of six chickadee species in Canada. Named for its signature call – "chickadee-dee-dee" – its broad range extends across the country. During cold winters, this songbird drops its body temperature to conserve energy, using the downy insulation of its feathers to keep warm.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

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