Flower Cards

SKU:
6513
$2.50

The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) undergoes the most spectacular insect migration on earth. Monarchs lay their eggs only on milkweed, a plant that is both poisonous and very sensitive to chemical herbicides. Promoting pesticide-free farming, and protecting and planting milkweed will help preserve the monarch.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6521
$2.50

Tiger or Columbia lilies (Lilium columbianum) are native to the southern mountains of British Columbia and Alberta. The bulb of this flower is traditionally used by First Nations as a raw spicy snack or cooked as sweet starch, often mixed with salmon roe. Cutting the flowers or digging up their bulbs other than for traditional aboriginal uses is discouraged as this can hinder natural propagation.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

SKU:
6531
$2.50

The hardiest of pollinators, the rusty-patched bumblebee (Bombus affinis), thermoregulates — generates heat by shivering — allowing it to withstand cold most other bees can’t tolerate. This bee has undergone a catastrophic collapse by 99 per cent in the past three decades in Canada. A ban on neonicotinoid pesticides is required if we’re going to give these bees a chance.

The greeting card is blank inside; printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper, measures 5” x 7” and comes with a 100% recycled envelope.

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